Top 10 Places To Visit in Irpinia

Abbazia del Goleto

Abbazia del Goleto, Sant’Angelo dei Lombardi (AV)

This past week, the Region of Campania released its new tourist map, highlighting must-see locales for visitors— including such well-known sites as Naples, Pompeii, the Amalfi Coast, Sorrento, Paestum, and others. What was striking, as seen below, was that the map excluded must-see locations in Avellino Province. I have been told that this map highlights only UNESCO sites,  but it is not clear on a first glance. (It does, however, raise the question– how do we get Irpinian locales on the UNESCO World Heritage map?)

As an American of Irpinian descent, I do not profess to have all of the answers to when it comes to a “must-see” list for all of Avellino Province. I believe that name “Irpinia” should be just as well-known as Tuscany, Rome, Sicily, Venice, or any other heavily-traveled location throughout Italy. I started this blog because I firmly believe that this incredible section of Italy deserves its rightful place among more well-known locations and that it should be a destination for all, not just for those who claim heritage from the region.

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La Repubblica Italiana As Seen From Irpinia

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Celebrations for the Festa della Repubblica begin at the Altar of the Fatherland monument in Rome and include a flyover in the Italian colors, as seen here.

La Festa della Repubblica Italiana (Italian National Day) is celebrated annually on June 2 in commemoration of the 1946 referendum where Italians went to the polls to decide on what form of government they would like to have following World War II and the fall of fascism. On this day, 12, 717,923 votes were cast in favor of a republic, while 10,719, 284 were cast hoping to retain the monarchy. Following this vote, the male descendants of the House of Savoy were sent into exile. Continue reading